http://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Maryann_DiEdwardo
Maryann Pasda DiEdwardo

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Hepburn

Reference 308
Wikipedia
Katharine Hepburn

The legacy of Hepburn lies both on screen and off. Broadcaster Sheridan Morley has said she "broke the mold" for women in Hollywood,[307] where she brought a new breed of strong-willed females to the screen.[232] Film academic Andrew Britton wrote a monograph studying Hepburn's "key presence within classical Hollywood, a consistent, potentially radical disturbance",[300] and pinpoints her "central" influence in bringing feminist issues to the screen.[299] Maryann Pasda DiEdwardo has claimed that Hepburn's performances fostered a "decisiveness toward a new vision of women."[308] Off screen, Hepburn lived in a manner ahead of her time.[238] She thus came to symbolize the "modern woman" and played a part in changing attitudes towards the gender.[82][309] Horton and Simmons write, "Confident, intelligent and witty, four-time Oscar winner Katharine Hepburn defied convention throughout her professional and personal life ... Hepburn provided an image of an assertive woman whom [females] could watch and learn from."[310] After Hepburn's death, film historian Jeanine Basinger stated, "What she brought us was a new kind of heroine—modern and independent. She was beautiful, but she did not rely on that."[176] Mary McNamara, an entertainment journalist and reviewer for the Los Angeles Times wrote, "More than a movie star, Katharine Hepburn was the patron saint of the independent American female."[82] She was not universally revered by feminists, however, who were angered by her public declarations that women "cannot have it all", meaning a family and a career.[82]

Maryann Pasda DiEdwardo is quoted in wikipedia for her writing about Katharine Hepburn.

Visit the page http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Katharine_Hepburn

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Maryann Pasda DiEdwardo has claimed that Hepburn's performances fostered a "decisiveness toward a new vision of women."[308] Off screen, Hepburn lived in a manner ahead of her time.[238]

'''Maryann DiEdwardo''' is the author of Music Transforms the College English Classroom
http://openlibrary.org/books/OL11972010M/Music_Transforms_the_College_English_Classroom
a researcher who has connected music and linguistic intelligences. In 2004, statistical results of Maryann DiEdwardo's case study research suggest that pairing music and linguistic intelligences in the college classroom improves students’ grades and abilities to compose theses statements for research papers in courses that emphasize reading and writing skills (DiEdwardo 2004 http://www.eric.ed.gov/ERICWebPortal/search/detailmini.jsp?_nfpb=true&_&ERICExtSearch_SearchValue_0=EJ773903&ERICExtSearch_SearchType_0=no&accno=EJ773903).

In initial study in 2003, Maryann refined Howard Gardner’s (1993) definition of music as a “separate intellectual competence” and compared music intelligence to linguistic intelligence. Furthermore, through acknowledgement of MI Theory, educators infuse cognitive abilities of students by helping them “think” as one of my students suggested. As Howard Gardner suggests, “Very worthwhile. The next step is to figure out why you got the effects that you did. Is music motivational? Does it activate other brain centers? Does it have some kind of intrinsic link to linguistic capacities? Would the effect work the other way around, or with other materials (2004 email)?”